National Family Health Survey (NFHS-4) 2015-16: Maharashtra

01 Sep, 2017


    FACTOIDS

  1. Almost 49 per cent of the households in Maharashtra were located in urban areas. On an average, they had 4.5 members. Thirteen per cent of all households were headed by women, and 10 per cent of the population lived in women-led families. 

  2. Nearly 79 per cent of households were headed by Hindus, 11 per cent by Muslims, and 9 percent by Buddhists/Neo-Buddhists.

  3. One-fourth of Maharashtra’s population was under the age of 15; only 8 per cent was 65 years of age and above.

  4. One-fourth of Maharashtra’s population was under the age of 15; only 8 per cent was 65 years of age and above.

  5. School attendance was 95 per cent for the 6-14 age group, but it dropped sharply to 74 per cent between the ages 15 and 17.

  6. Men (62 per cent) were much more likely than women (35 per cent) to read a newspaper or magazine at least once a week.

  7. Looking at the 2017 fertility rates, the report said that women with no schooling had one child more than women with 12 or more years of schooling. Similarly, the total fertility rate of Muslim women (2.3 children per woman) was higher than that of Hindu women (1.8 children per woman) and Buddhist/Neo-Buddhist women (1.7 children per woman).

  8. Women in Maharashtra were much more likely to use contraception if they already had a son. Among women with two children, contraception was used by 80 per cent who had at least one son as compared to 55 per cent who had two daughters and no sons. 

  9. Women in Maharashtra were much more likely to use contraception if they already had a son. Among women with two children, contraception was used by 80 per cent who had at least one son as compared to 55 per cent who had two daughters and no sons. 

  10. Approximately 90 per cent of births took place in a health facility, while 10 per cent took place at home.

  11. Postnatal care after birth was most common in a health facility. In 81 per cent of births in public health facilities and 86 per cent of births in private health facilities, mothers had a postnatal check-up within two days. As compared to this, in only 41 per cent of home births did mothers receive similar care.

  12. Only 15 per cent of households in Maharashtra had any kind of health insurance that covered at least one member of the household.

  13. Overall, 21 per cent of women, who were or had been married, had experienced physical or sexual violence from their current or most recent husbands.

  14. Around 49 percent of women believed that a husband was justified in beating his wife under certain circumstances. Of these women, 37 per cent felt it was acceptable if a woman showed disrespect for her in-laws; 28 per cent, if she neglected the house or children; and 24 per cent, if her husband suspected her of being unfaithful. 

  15. Only 36 per cent of all women aged 15-49 were employed in the 12 months preceding the survey. In the same period, 83 per cent of all men aged 15-49 were employed.

    Factoids and Focus by Pratik Dixit.


FOCUS

Since 1992, the International Institute for Population Sciences, Mumbai, has conducted the National Family Health Survey (NFHS) for the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare. The survey provides information on population, health and nutrition in each state and union territory of India. This state report from Maharashtra presents key findings of the survey’s fourth round, conducted in 35 districts from April 1, 2015 to September 25, 2015. Previous NFHS surveys were conducted in 1992-93, 1998-99 and 2005-06.

NFHS-4 surveyed 572,000 households in 640 districts of India as per the 2011 census. In Maharashtra, data was gathered from 26,890 homes; 29,460 women (aged 15-49) and 4,811 men (aged 15-54) were interviewed.

The survey collected information on the socio-economic characteristics of households, education, fertility, family planning, infant and child mortality, maternal and child health, reproductive health, sexual behaviour, marriage, domestic violence, attitudes towards gender roles, HIV/AIDS status, nutrition, water, sanitation, and health services and insurance.


AUTHOR

International Institute for Population Sciences, Mumbai